4 Ways to Add Protein in Your Vegetarian Diet
Food,  Health,  Self Improvement,  Wellness

4 Ways to Add Protein in Your Vegetarian Diet

How many times have you heard of eating your protein? A million times probably. It’s one of the most important weight loss tips around.  This is especially true for those who gym regularly or are looking forward to making exercise part of their daily routine. 

But while chicken, fish, eggs, etc. are some of the most widely available and rich sources of protein, it’s not an option for a vegan or vegetarian. So, how do you meet your daily protein requirement? With the help of this blog. 

Here are a few of the best options to add protein in the diet for vegans and vegetarians.

Soy

Soy

Soybeans are generally the easiest form of protein available for vegetarians. It’s an exciting meal option because not only is it rich in protein, it can be consumed in different forms. From tofu, milk and simple beans to protein powder, soy can be your best option. 

Just to give you an idea, there’s approximately 68 grams of protein in 1 cup of soybeans. Not to forget the minerals, vitamins and other nutritional elements that come with eating soybeans or any other soy product. 

There are studies that indicate that soy can also help aid weight loss provided a healthy routine is followed. So, it’s pretty clear that adding soy forms in your diet is beneficial in every way (except if you are allergic).

Cottage Cheese

Cottage Cheese

Cottage cheese may not be like your conventional cheddar or parmesan but it for sure is a healthy, protein rich alternative. 100 grams of cottage cheese gives you 11 grams of protein. 

It’s a dairy product that is also packed with essential nutrients like calcium, sodium, folate, riboflavin, healthy fats, etc. And yet again, cottage cheese is a vegetarian option that is versatile. It can go on top of a salad or be cooked into a delicious cottage cheese steak. 

Cottage cheese also contains a low amount of lactose which makes it a viable diet option for lactose intolerant people too. Take your time to add it into different healthy recipes

Mushroom

Mushroom

This edible fungi is a great way to elevate your meals with protein. Though it’s not as rich as the other options, mushrooms are undoubtedly a protein source that you do not want to miss out on. 

In addition to having 2.2g of protein per cup, this edible fungi is also rich in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and vitamin C. With regular intake, mushrooms provide several health benefits for people suffering from heart health conditions, blood sugar and cancer.

You can find a variety of mushrooms in the market, each one with different flavor profiles and protein levels. But, if you need one that contains the most protein, white mushrooms are your best bet. 

Lentils

Lentils

With 18 grams of protein per cup, lentils are a perfect protein source for vegetarians. Protein covers 25% of its nutritional value. You can find them in different shapes and colors. Each one is nutrient dense and perfect to be a part of everyday meals. 

Lentils are rich in fiber, zinc, folate, niacin, vitamin B6 and other vitamins and minerals. It’s worth including in your diet even if you are not on a diet or follow a healthy routine. 

Furthermore, lentils are easy to make and delicious too. Make it into a curry or a quick soup, you can try anything. It takes a few minutes. And meanwhile your lentils are cooking, you can take time to do a Harry Potter quiz or Learn about the vibes you give off here https://quizzboom.com.

Conclusion

So, do you still think you don’t have enough options to cater to your protein requirement? Now, you don’t just have to rely on tasteless protein powders or brussels sprouts. You have the freedom to choose between a cottage cheese steak, a lentils lasagne or a mushroom burrito. And rest assured that you will get enough protein to build your muscles and have a healthy lifestyle that you desire. 

Kylie is a food fanatic who can go to extreme lengths when it comes to learning about cuisines. She has been blogging for over a decade and is an integral part of the food industry in the United States. If she isn't busy writing a piece for her blog, you can find her spending some time in museums and cultural heritage sites.